May. 5th, 2010

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  • 13:58 What a career in defrauding the world can get you: bit.ly/9kyKT3 #
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Via the Patriot Post.

The Foundation

"[P]erfection falls not to the share of mortals." --George Washington

Editorial Exegesis

The Deepwater Horizon oil rig before the explosion

"The oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico threatens to do as much damage to U.S. energy policy as it has to the environment. Obama's weeks-old executive order allowing for limited coastal exploration -- which we never considered a sure thing -- has been stayed and will probably be rescinded. ... Oil remains the most cost-effective source of transportation fuel we have; as long as our economy is thriving, we will need to produce or import a lot of it. Global-warming alarmists and zealous proponents of alternative energy have already made the BP spill the new Exhibit A in their case against fossil fuels. In evaluating their claims, we should be mindful of the economic and environmental costs of the spill relative to those associated with their preferred alternatives. Consider the cost of cap-and-trade legislation, for instance. It's hard to know what the economic damages of this spill will be, but even if they exceed the estimated $7 billion that it cost to clean up the Exxon Valdez spill, that would still be a far cry from the estimated $161 billion annual hit to GDP that would result from enactment of the Waxman-Markey cap-and-trade bill. ... As for the administration's now-it's-lifted, now-it's-not drilling ban, most of the exploration and drilling that would take place if Obama actually followed through would be located in shallower coastal waters. The safety record of shallow-water drilling remains very impressive, and this deep-water calamity neither tarnishes that record nor indicates that it couldn't be duplicated if Obama opened more of the coastline to exploration. In any case, the president's moratorium on new drilling is a self-defeating proposition: New rigs will take years to construct and to begin production; their safeguards will incorporate whatever lessons we learn from the investigation of this catastrophe. ... 'Drill, baby, drill,' has lost whatever usefulness it may have had as a slogan, but offshore drilling remains a crucial source of energy -- and clearing obstacles to future exploration is still part of the right policy mix." --National Review

 

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Short Cuts

"Al Sharpton promised to lead protest marches in Phoenix and Tucson Thursday to support the rights of illegal aliens to work in farm and service jobs in the United States. It's come to this. Civil rights leaders are marching in support of slave labor." --comedian Argus Hamilton

"At San Francisco's City Hall, where bottled water is banned as the drink of climate denialists, Mayor Gavin Newsom is boycotting for real: All official visits to Arizona have been canceled indefinitely. You couldn't get sanctions like these imposed at the UN Security Council, but then, unlike Arizona, Iran is not a universally reviled pariah. Will a full-scale economic embargo devastate the Copper State? Who knows? It's not clear to me what San Francisco imports from Arizona. Chaps?" --columnist Mark Steyn

"Those who shower the most praise on our public education system are those least likely to ever expose their own kids to it. I refer to the pinheads who hold public office. In fact, the only time a president or first lady ever wanders into a public school in Washington, D.C., is for an election year photo op, after having made certain that their Secret Service detail is operating at full strength that day. It's not a school system, it's a penal colony with report cards." --columnist Burt Prelutsky

"The Administration is not slick enough to cover its lack of concern at the front end of the BP oil leak. With apologies to Oscar Hammerstein, 'When do you spell an oil spill like Katrina?'" --political analyst Rich Galen



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